Four Tips to Remember When Welcoming New Talent

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Whether you work for large or small company, turnover is inevitable. People will come and go as they move along in their professional journey. Similarly, as companies grow and evolve, new positions will be created allowing for the recruitment of new talent.

Whatever the case may be, anytime a new individual is coming aboard, it is crucial to not lose sight of their experience of joining the company.

From observations throughout my own personal experience, I’ve drafted four friendly reminders to ensure that the “newbie” is a happy camper.

Be Prepared

This might seem obvious but you would be surprised at how unprepared some places can be. Ensure their workstation is clean and ready for them, that their phone works properly, and that they are generally in a position to get started. Of course there will be some kinks to iron out, but the more prepared you are for them, the less issues will likely arise. This will also alleviate unnecessary loss of productivity in their first week and allow them to delve into their new job faster.

Make Them Feel Welcome

We can often lose sight of this when we are swamped with our day-to-day activities. A new hire is brought over to your desk for a friendly intro and you haphazardly look up and mutter a hello before you turn back to your work.

Not good.

Take a moment to think about the new hire and their perspective. Imagine that was you on the first day of your job and your new colleague just snubbed you. It will not only make you feel unwelcome, but also set an unpleasant tone for the company’s standards for morale.

If you’re the social media manager for the company, a great way to make a new hire feel welcome is by announcing it on your social channels. They will be delighted by their 15 seconds of fame.

Make Yourself Approachable

It can be daunting for any new hire to begin developing new relationships with their peers. That’s why it’s so important to be proactive in making them feel part of the team. Depending on your working relationship with the new individual, make sure to offer your time to them by scheduling a one on one session to get introduced to each other’s roles and responsibilities or consider chatting over a cup of coffee later in the week. This small gesture can do wonders in helping to break the ice and make the new employee feel more welcome and comfortable.

Put On An Act

This one is important, especially if you’ve reached the end of the line at your job. Never ever start bad-mouthing the company when asked what it’s like to work for the organization. In spite of however you feel personally, don’t make it obvious that you’re unhappy yourself. Let them decide for themselves what they think about the company and allow them to form their own opinion.

These are just a few reminders to help maintain a healthy and welcoming environment to new talent. In this digitally-savvy society we now live in, a company’s reputation is highly dependent on the online conversations being had about it. Reputation is no longer just about corporate jargon and a logo, it’s about the people, inside and out.

If a person is happy with their experience, only positive chatter will likely ensue. On the flip side, if they are unhappy, then negative sentiment will follow, which could have an adverse on the company’s image and their ability to continue attracting and retaining more talent in the long run.

As the saying goes,  first impressions are lasting impressions.

The header image in this post can be found here.

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4 thoughts on “Four Tips to Remember When Welcoming New Talent

  1. I am pretty sure the last thing a new hire wants to hear is “who are you again?” or “We’ve got a desk around here someplace.”
    My work is not good at having a place for new hires–and we hire a lot of them in the summer. I guess there isn’t the will for change.

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